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Not Just For St Davids Day!

Updated: Mar 23

Daffodils


The beauty of daffodils is endless. Sporting that wonderful trumpet-shaped head giving us a glimpse of Spring, the glimpse of what Mother Nature has to offer us. With its bright yellowness and so many varieties ranging from white or pastel yellow with some even pink or green. So much to this beautiful flower, sometimes more then we give it credit for.

There are over 50 species and approximately 13,000 varieties. Who would have thought that?



We associate the daffodil with St Davids Day on the 1st of MarchDydd Gŵyl Dewi Hapus” Lloyd George wore the daffodil on this day and encouraged its use at the investiture of the Prince of Wales in 1911. But way back before even a glimpse in the eye of Lloyd George came the wonderful legend of the Greek God Narcissus. He fell in love with his own reflection in the river, unfortunately drowning trying to recapture his reflection. Witnessing this unfortunate event displaying their own wonderful reflection were daffodils and so became associated with the name Narcissus


So what do daffodils symbolise? Their primary symbolism is that of new beginnings, rebirth and the coming of Spring, but they have many others:


  • Creativity

  • Inspiration

  • Renewal and Vitality

  • Awareness and Inner Reflection

  • Memory

  • Forgiveness


Across cultures, there is of cause similar uplifting meanings for instance


  • China: The daffodil symbolizes good fortune. It is so esteemed for its ability to bring positive things that it is the official symbol of the Chinese New Year.

  • Japan: To the Japanese people, the daffodil means mirth and joyousness.

  • France: Here the daffodil is a sign of hope.

  • Wales: A Welsh legend claims that the first person to find the first daffodil bloom will be blessed with more gold than silver in the upcoming year.

  • Arabian Countries: Here it is believed the daffodil flower is an aphrodisiac as well as a cure for baldness.

  • Medieval Europe: They believed that if your gaze caused a daffodil to droop it was an omen of impending death.

  • United States: Here the daffodil is the official symbol for the American Cancer Association, symbolizing hope for a cure. It is also the flower for March and the symbol of the 10th Wedding Anniversary.


Looking at the daffodil from a holistic point of view, what can this wonderful flower offer us, bearing in mind the bulb is poisonous?



  • Narcissus Plaster: A plaster made from the bulbs of the narcissus plant is used to relieve the pain associated with arthritis, wounds, burns and strains.

  • Traditional Medicine: Research on the use of the narcissus plant for treating Alzheimer’s disease is currently underway.

  • Herbal Remedies: Daffodil is thought to treat asthma, colds and whooping cough and to induce vomiting, but caution is advised, as daffodil can be a dangerous remedy.

  • Fragrance: Essential oils made from the narcissus plant are sometimes used to promote relaxation and reduce stress, but caution must be exercised as too much oil can cause headaches and vomiting. Daffodil oil can be used in crafts or making potpourri. It is also used in perfumes and cosmetics.

So in a nutshell the daffodils message that they give to you is one of upliftment, energizing, which makes it the perfect flower to celebrate new beginnings or simply to express your desire to revive an old relationship. An absolute fantastic housewarming gift or to celebrate a birth. Or just simply a beautiful way to adorn your house and celebrate Springs on your doorstep.


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